Logo

 

Banner Image:   Baptist-Times-banner-2000x370-
Template Mode:   Baptist Times
Icon
    Post     Tweet


Faitheism by Krish Kandiah   



Faitheism 'nails the discussion between those with faith and those without incredibly well'



FaitheismFaitheism 
By Krish Kandiah 
Hodder & Stoughton 
ISBN: 9781473648944 
Reviewed by: Keith Parr 


 
Before you read this there are some things you need to know; I am not on commission from Krish, nor am I a personal friend of his. I've met him a couple of times and, even though I now live in Liverpool, still believe he supports the wrong football team. 

When you see this book at your favourite book store or online seller, buy it! Just buy it! Krish nails the discussion between those with faith and those without incredibly well.

The book is well researched, with Krish bringing his experience from his diverse ministry, sharing stories and showing that drawing battle lines between atheists and Christians does more harm than good. Each of the short chapters takes a preconception about Christians and atheists and picks it apart. Looking at the four 'C's (proof Krish is a Baptist preacher, surely?) of Collision, Collusion, Contention and Collaboration he pulls no punches to find a way through the maze to a place of walking together. 

So buy this book. It will challenge you, and change your perceptions on the atheist approach to life - and maybe even bring some of our prejudices to the surface. It would be a great read for small groups (Krish kindly throws some questions at you at the end of each chapter), especially if that group has people on their own journey toward faith. 

Hopefully Krish has more gems like this locked away in that Liverpool-supporting brain of his. 


Keith is the minister at Maghull Baptist Church, north of Liverpool 


 
 

Baptist Times, 05/10/2018
    Post     Tweet
If you want to slow down and spread advent over an entire month, here is a super little package to help you along
A literary analysis of the Gospel, which aims to show how and why John has written as he does
An intriguing, deeply moving and occasionally puzzling read, which raises more questions than answers
Offers useful principles for Christian politics, but while the author rejects the fundamentalist view of Scripture, he does not offer a viable alternative
Personal grief leads to a fresh understanding of the Psalms - and 'one of the best devotional books I have read in a long time'
Emily Owen explores the idea that God has always been leaving personalised calling cards to his followers to remind them of his presence, and the result is a rewarding, meditative read, free of sentimentality
     Reviews 
    Posted: 08/10/2021
    Posted: 17/09/2021
    Posted: 30/07/2021